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PanamaVeggie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PanamaVeggie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jan 2015 at 9:18pm
Originally posted by patsy patsy wrote:

Originally posted by PanamaVeggie PanamaVeggie wrote:

Hey everyone :)
I'm seriously jealous of those who got ghost stories! I'm struggling with comedy (comedy/a foreign exchange program/a web designer).

Does anyone know if my story has to be set in the present...can I go past or future or can you only do that if you draw historical fiction or sci-fi? It seems to me that it's probably ok to play around with time and place provided it's funny, since I drew comedy...but what do you all think?

I've already written two different stories...not complete ones, I get to about 1000 words and decide I hate the premise or am just not going to be able to make it work. Would love to know whether I can step outside of the present before I start working on lucky number three!   

THANKS!

There's no set time frame.  As long as you hit all your prompts, you can set the story anywhere you want :)  I had Rom Com in flash, and used a fantasy setting with trolls, so feel free to play!!


Awesome, thank you! I was really hoping to hear from someone who'd done it before. Trolls...nice!!!
Be kinder. Laugh a lot. Enjoy life. Love mightily.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scarlet Screenwriter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 2:55am
Originally posted by plkphoto plkphoto wrote:

Originally posted by Scarlet Screenwriter Scarlet Screenwriter wrote:

I don't know if I can give advice on how to score more points ... some of my best stories with the best peer feedback scored zero ... but there seems to be ways to lose points with some pedantic judges ... not spelling out numbers under ten, using international spelling, bad formatting, etc.


Hmmm.... After living in Australia for 8+ years (or is that "eight-plus years"?) and training myself to use British spelling, now I'm going to have to revert back to American spelling, it sounds like.... You'd think with a global challenge that the judges would be able to handle both, though I did notice that most of my group, at least, was from the US. Maybe I can find a beta who's just as pedantic.

Originally posted by Scarlet Screenwriter Scarlet Screenwriter wrote:

What I can advise is to write to the best of your abilities and follow your instincts.  Take risks if that's what you feel ... I once write a story about pen pals and the whole entry was the to and fro pen pal letters, formatted as letters.  It felt right and scored well.  One horror entry was a post-apocolyptic diary. 

Instincts are good - except that my instincts are currently saying "Why are you putting me through this stress? I don't know how to write a ghost story!" Hopefully a good walk and a read through some ghost stories will shock them out of their current stupor. 

Originally posted by Scarlet Screenwriter Scarlet Screenwriter wrote:

This challenge is a writer's gym, not a performance ... have a good workout and develop your creative muscles ... it's you against yourself, not the other writers or the judges.  I find half of the judge's comments are crap.  


I read back through some of the comments posted in the forums from last years competition, and I think that the forum comments are definitely the more helpful. It seems that if you make it to the final round you will get some decent feedback, but I guess with 1400+ stories to read there will be quite a bit of skimping on the first round comments.

Thank you for your helpful post! <img src="smileys/smiley10.gif" alt="Star" title="Star" />






Maaaaaate! Do they speak English in The Alice? I haven't been there in a few years ... 😉.

It's not so much spelling anymore ... You can change your spell checker language as I used to ... To catch the odd colour or honour or armour ... Or lift instead of elevator, etc ... But there are enough Pomms and Aussies here now to bring about change. It is more colloquialisms that I slip into that catch me out ... You usually don't notice them until someone asks for an explanation.

Chookas!






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote plkphoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 3:45am
Originally posted by Scarlet Screenwriter Scarlet Screenwriter wrote:

 

Maaaaaate! Do they speak English in The Alice? I haven't been there in a few years ... 😉.

It's not so much spelling anymore ... You can change your spell checker language as I used to ... To catch the odd colour or honour or armour ... Or lift instead of elevator, etc ... But there are enough Pomms and Aussies here now to bring about change. It is more colloquialisms that I slip into that catch me out ... You usually don't notice them until someone asks for an explanation.

Chookas!

.

Um... yes and no. The language you hear being yelled across the street may or may not be English, though the curse words usually are. Also, Kanga Bangas are a thing at most barbeques -- which definitely should not show up in a story for an American audience.

The one that threw me off (and made my colleagues go into gales of wild laughter when I first arrived) was the whole "fanny pack" versus "bum bag" issue. These were commonly used for first aid kits as I worked outside, and I soon learned what NOT to call them. 

Words like "deadly" definitely have a different meaning here than they would in a ghost story... The Deadly Awards are something you need to watch if you want to converse with anyone for a few weeks after they occur. Having said that, "Deadly Awards" would make a good subject for a ghost story... hmmm.....

Anyhow, I have adjusted my document by resetting spell-checker to US and page size to "US letter" (in case some poor judge decides to print it out). I remember how many times that caught me out when we first moved here!

Catchya! 

(BTW: You should totes come visit... lots of rain means we're now living in the Green Centre. A fly-net on your swag and mozzie repellent are definitely required, though.)





Edited by plkphoto - 19 Jan 2015 at 3:48am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scarlet Screenwriter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 6:20am
Originally posted by plkphoto plkphoto wrote:

Originally posted by Scarlet Screenwriter Scarlet Screenwriter wrote:

 

Maaaaaate! Do they speak English in The Alice? I haven't been there in a few years ... 😉.

It's not so much spelling anymore ... You can change your spell checker language as I used to ... To catch the odd colour or honour or armour ... Or lift instead of elevator, etc ... But there are enough Pomms and Aussies here now to bring about change. It is more colloquialisms that I slip into that catch me out ... You usually don't notice them until someone asks for an explanation.

Chookas!

.


Um... yes and no. The language you hear being yelled across the street may or may not be English, though the curse words usually are. Also, Kanga Bangas are a thing at most barbeques -- which definitely should not show up in a story for an American audience.

The one that threw me off (and made my colleagues go into gales of wild laughter when I first arrived) was the whole "fanny pack" versus "bum bag" issue. These were commonly used for first aid kits as I worked outside, and I soon learned what NOT to call them. 

Words like "deadly" definitely have a different meaning here than they would in a ghost story... The Deadly Awards are something you need to watch if you want to converse with anyone for a few weeks after they occur. Having said that, "Deadly Awards" would make a good subject for a ghost story... hmmm.....

Anyhow, I have adjusted my document by resetting spell-checker to US and page size to "US letter" (in case some poor judge decides to print it out). I remember how many times that caught me out when we first moved here!

Catchya! 

(BTW: You should totes come visit... lots of rain means we're now living in the Green Centre. A fly-net on your swag and mozzie repellent are definitely required, though.)






Lol ... Fanny as opposed to bum ... Of course, fanny means a lady's front bottom down here. I was raised in the US, so that was an early one. I grew up as Randy (Randall) and I stopped using that name immediately.

Also, Australians tend to use a lot of euphamisms, usually for bodily functions and body parts. I sometimes slip into those quite easily without thinking ... Letting Fluffy off the leash ... Kitty's got a nosebleed ... Dropping the kids off at the pool ... Seeing Mrs. Palmer tonight ... That kind of thing.

I tend to like Kangaroo fillet or burgers ... They do meatballs, too, now ... Best red meat for you health wise and good for the environment .. No methane, less water, no soil damage, native fodder ... Sustainable ... Actually endorsed by Greenpeace.

Keep cool and deadly, mate! Cheers.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hughsviewsandnews Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 11:46am
Oh no, I've just read that you get points deducted if you don't spell or use words the way they would be used in the USA e.g. lift as apposed to an elevator, pavement as apposed to sidewalk.   Is that really true?  

Would the judges not check from which country the author was from first?  It seems kinda unfair to me if us living outside of the USA get penalised on not spelling or using certain words they would sound/look in the States.  I hate the thought of having to write 'color' instead of 'colour' or 'humor' instead of 'humour.' Any advice would be greatly appreciated before I carry on writing my first ever entry to this competition.Confused  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Corrie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 11:52am
I am pretty sure I used Canadian spelling in the flash and was never called out by the judges for it. But I have seen people get dinged when they used non-American words like lift vs. elevator, etc. Doesn't seem fair in an international competition...especially if the story is *taking place* in the location where that sort of word would actually be used. But there you have it.
 
Here's my 1st Round story: Pleasantview House
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hughsviewsandnews Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 12:09pm
Originally posted by Corrie Corrie wrote:

I am pretty sure I used Canadian spelling in the flash and was never called out by the judges for it. But I have seen people get dinged when they used non-American words like lift vs. elevator, etc. Doesn't seem fair in an international competition...especially if the story is *taking place* in the location where that sort of word would actually be used. But there you have it.
 

Thanks, Corrie.  So the spelling of the words looks to be OK then, whereas the actual words and what is used, don't.  So I'm going to have say "freeway" instead of "motorway" even if my story is set in the UK and goes something like this?

Corrie pointed at the road sign and said "look, it's that way to London, you have to join the freeway like the road sign says."

I'd be writing it as - Corrie pointed at the road sign and said "look, it's that way to London, you have to join the motorway like the road sign says."
Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jenspenden Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 12:20pm
Originally posted by hughsviewsandnews hughsviewsandnews wrote:

Originally posted by Corrie Corrie wrote:

I am pretty sure I used Canadian spelling in the flash and was never called out by the judges for it. But I have seen people get dinged when they used non-American words like lift vs. elevator, etc. Doesn't seem fair in an international competition...especially if the story is *taking place* in the location where that sort of word would actually be used. But there you have it.
 

Thanks, Corrie.  So the spelling of the words looks to be OK then, whereas the actual words and what is used, don't.  So I'm going to have say "freeway" instead of "motorway" even if my story is set in the UK and goes something like this?

Corrie pointed at the road sign and said "look, it's that way to London, you have to join the freeway like the road sign says."

I'd be writing it as - Corrie pointed at the road sign and said "look, it's that way to London, you have to join the motorway like the road sign says."
Confused

I've heard some writers here send their story to an American beta reader to look for those spellings/terms/slang words. It's too bad it has to happen, but if you want to play it safe and avoid this entire matter, that's what I'd do.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hughsviewsandnews Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 12:34pm
OK, Jen, so does that mean that I'd almost certainly be deducted points (if I had any to be deducted Smile) if I did use "Motorway" rather than "freeway"?  

I suppose the best way I can find an American Beta reader and what if any fees they charge is by using google.  I'm concerned now that even if I did send my story to an American Beta reader that I may not get it back before the deadline, meaning I have less time to write my story. Ugh!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EmmaFinlayson-Palmer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2015 at 3:58pm
I'm in the UK, I hadn't really given the difference in spellings any thought. Should I change things to American spelling?
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